Kevin Witt: A look at announcing



Dave,
 I'm not really sure if you're taking it. If not, consider this just venting.
 
 I'm reading the Bret Hart book for the third time, and like I enjoy with other biographies, I like to watch the matches that these guys think were special to them. Among others, Bret mentioned his match with Mr. Perfect in the semifinals of the King of the Ring. I was pleased to see this was on Bret's DVD, so I popped it in. Bret talked about how Perfect wanted to show the front office he still had plenty left, and you could see right from the beginning, Curt had his working shoes on.
 
 Talking now about how Jim Ross is so badly underutilized is not exactly a hot topic. Nor is how Michael Cole's new style completely detracts from the current product. We've come to barely tolerate it because it is what it is. Thirty seconds into the Hart-Perfect match, I realized just how much I missed the way things used to be - and how much great announcing really, really can be a positive thing for a match.
 
 It was Ross, Randy Savage and Bobby Heenan. Right away, we knew Bam Bam Bigelow was in the final and would face the winner of this tournament, which they kept hammering how important it was to win. Bang! I was invested. Hart and Perfect opened up fast and you could feel Jim Ross keeping up with the action, taking me on the ride. It was like an added bonus I have become so used to not getting. I also thought Heenan and Macho were really good. I'm pretty sure Savage was a a face here. Obviously, Heenan was a heel. They got that across, but not in a way that detracted from the match. All three kept putting over the performance and how important it was.
 
I'm not going to go play-by-play, because the match is pretty easy to find. I'll just finish up by saying it was worth losing the sleep to watch, and still two days later, I've been thinking enough about it to take the time to write.
 
Thanks for everything you do,
Kevin Witt