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Pro wrestling writer Scott Williams passes away at 49

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Scott Williams, a lawyer and newspaper editor who co-authored the autobiographies of Cowboy Bill Watts, Terry Funk and Jim Duggan, and was an integral part of the Wrestling Observer Newsletter for years, passed away last night at the age of 49.

Williams had been a close friend for decades. He grew up watching Houston Wrestling with Paul Boesch, and was probably the most knowledgeable fan of Mid South Wrestling that there was, with a far greater memory of the matches and angles than even the people who put the shows together themselves.

He also served in the Persian Gulf War. He did editing work for the Observer over the years and helped with legal issues, as well as understanding them. He was one of the most honest and conscientious reporters I've ever worked with at any level.

Williams had been working with Jim Ross and Paul O'Brien on Ross' autobiography for some time and had recently had talks with Bruce Prichard and Greg Valentine regarding future wrestling projects. He had told me just a few weeks ago he was very excited because his project with Greg Valentine would have been a book on Johnny Valentine, Greg's father, a legendary wrestler and all-time great somewhat forgotten by the modern generation.

He was also instrumental in picking out matches for an upcoming DVD release of classic Houston wrestling matches. He had also written the book, "Hardcore History: The Extremely Unauthorized Story of ECW" in 2006.

Not much in the way of details are available but his passing was sudden. Apparently he had complained of some pains last night but didn't indicate it was anything serious, and just went out to his back porch and never came back in, and when his wife went out to see him, he appeared to have suffered a heart attack.

Williams' young son, Brody, named after Frank Goodish's wrestling character, was almost savant like when it came to the Royal Rumble, knowing all the facts and figures on eliminations on the history of the event.

Williams was a court reporter for the Galveston County Daily News from 1998 to 2008, and his interest in that subject and a belief that the newspaper industry's future wasn't bright led to him leave and get a law degree. He first worked as an assistant district attorney in Brazoria County and later opened up a private practice in Galveston.

In January, he had noted to me that his feelings were that local newspapers were here to stay, and he returned to the Galveston County Daily News as assistant managing editor.

On a personal level, Scott was one of my most trusted friends and his historical knowledge was always a huge help, as well as his court room and legal knowledge.